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Safe4Athletes

Wednesday, 22 October 2014 08:35

Learn about adopting the Safe4Athletes Program

athletesfaq

Safe4Athletes has created a video to learn more about adopting the Safe4Athletes program at your club or school.  

The video will also give you a brief overview of abuse in sports.  We encourage everyone to take a few minutes

and learn about abusive behaviour in sports and what

you can do to protect your sports environment as an athlete or a parent.  

For more information on how to adopt a Safe4Athletes program visit  4-clubs 

For more information for athletes information can be found at  4-athletes 

Click here to View the Video

 

 

Published in Safe4Athletes Blog
Monday, 05 May 2014 13:38

Safe4Athletes Survey Results

Safe4Athletes Survey Results

Introduction:

Safe4Athletes developed an online survey to indentify current and former athletes and to learn about the type of harassment that may have been experienced over the course of their career. The survey allows for both  the athlete and a parent of athlete to respond.

Aims: To determine if there were any trends across sport, gender and competition level, that identify abuse levels for emotional, verbal, physical and sexual abuse.

Methods: The survey was distributed in phases;  the first phase was directed towards personal contacts, via Facebook ( friends and large number of Olympians from around the world), and private communication with contacts that have come to Safe4athletes with experience of abuse in some form in sports.  The second phase included a more public distribution with websites like Huffington Post, Momsteam,  (a focused parent/athlete audience) and the Safe4athletes website.

Level

Results: 155 participants – 103 Athletes – 52 Athlete/Parent;  Athletes 91 Female and 12 Male. 

Published in Safe4Athletes Blog
Wednesday, 06 November 2013 06:56

Has Bullying been Normalized in Sports?

This week, Richie Incognito, a Miami Dolphins NFL player, was suspended indefinitely for bullying his teammate, Jonathon Martin.

We need to ask ourselves why the cries of Jonathon Martin took so long to hear.  Where were his teammates, coaches, and the rest of people in the Dolphins organization? While the players have a code of conduct to which they have to adhere, why did it take the actions of Jonathon Martin feeling like he had to quit before someone heard him.

When you listen to players’ comments, they seem to go both ways, in defense of the behavior or complete shock from the organization.  Yet, despite the fact that the Dolphins coaching staff    and club infrastructure is in place with the entire NFL above them, apparently, it was not safe for Jonathon Martin to speak up and have the situation resolved before it  got to the point of needing to quit.

 Has bullying become so normalized that we can’t see the forest thru the trees? If we think that this is an isolated incident, and only related to Richie Incognito and the Miami Dolphins, then we are blind to what is really going on in sport.  At every level of sports there is bullying and it exists in a sport culture where teammates do not report abuse for fear of being chastised by coaches and fellow players.

 The focus of Safe4Athletes is to give every athlete a voice, including Jonathon Martin.  Jonathon should be able to practice and play his sport with the freedom and liberty that is afforded workers in the workplace.

 While the Safe4Athletes policies and procedures have been implemented at the open amateur and school/college levels of sports to address abuse, bullying, and harassment, we now see the need for such policies at the professional level for adult men and women to have a safe and positive experience while remaining competitive? 

 At every level of competition, including the NFL and other professional sports, there needs to be an identified safe place where athletes experiencing abuse, bullying, and harassment can go without fear of retribution from teammates, coaches, or management.  The Safe4Athletes model  requires the designation of an “athlete welfare advocate” (or team of athlete welfare advocates)    to address athletes’ safety needs. This advocate is necessary because of the huge power differential between athletes  and coaches, owners, and managers.  Even in the pros, athletes are “low men on the totem pole”.

 The athlete welfare advocate, coupled with an investigation that is activated when these issues arise, allows  the sports club  to   hear their athletes and give them a voice through a third party that can protect them from retaliation.

 We need to teach our athletes how to speak up and we need to listen to our athletes when they do have the courage to speak up.

 We need to pull our heads out of the sand and hear ALL our ATHLETES from Pop Warner to the NFL.   We need to make room for our athletes to speak out and we all need   to be better listeners.  We all need to realize that  listening is not always with our ears.  We have to observe players’ behaviors, challenge hostile and bullying actions and read the feelings of distressed athletes.  We must be more diligent at each of our sports programs.

 Let’s all hear and help every Jonathon Martin that is being bullied out there.

To learn more about adopting Safe4Athletes in your sports club and giving every athlete a voice, see our 4-Clubs Page

 

Published in Safe4Athletes Blog
Saturday, 09 February 2013 21:36

USA Swimming Safe Sport Handbook

 USA Swimming Safe Sport Handbook

There are a lot of great reasons to swim – at any level. As a life‐long activity, people often swim to have fun and spend time with friends. Swimming also encourages a healthy lifestyle and builds self‐confidence. Swimmers even benefit from the sport out of the water. They learn goal‐setting, teamwork and time management skills. Unfortunately, sports, including swimming, can also be a high‐risk environment for misconduct, including physical and sexual abuse. All forms of misconduct are intolerable and in direct conflict with the values of USA Swimming. Misconduct may damage an athlete’s psychological well‐being. Athletes who have been mistreated experience social embarrassment, emotional turmoil, psychological scars, loss of self‐esteem and negative impacts on their relationships with family, friends and the sport. Misconduct often hurts an athlete’s competitive performance and may cause him or her to drop out of our sport entirely. USA Swimming is committed to fostering a fun, healthy and safe sport enviornment for all its members. We all must recognize that the safety of swimmers lies with all those involved in the sport and is not the sole responsibility of any one person at the club, LSC, or national level.

Complete Handbook available for download

 

Published in Policy
Thursday, 03 May 2012 09:47

STAYING IN BOUNDS

STAYING IN BOUNDS

Why a Policy on Relationships with Student-Athletes?

Sexual relationships between coaches and student-athletes have become a serious problem. NCAA member
institutions must unambiguously and effectively prohibit such relationships to ensure that sport programs offer
a safe and empowering experience for all student-athletes.


This NCAA resource is designed to educate member institutions and their student-athletes about why sexual
or romantic relationships between athletics department staff and student-athletes are inappropriate, how to
avoid those relationships, and what to do if they occur. When adopted and enforced by institutions of higher
learning, this model policy will help create a safe, healthy environment on college campuses. Although most of
the examples offered herein refer to coaches, the policy is intended to provide clear guidance for all members
of the athletics department (including coaches, administrators, athletics trainers, and other staff), as well as
student-athletes and parents.

Full Text Here

or read more
Published in Policy
Sunday, 12 February 2012 10:31

4 UNIVERSITIES AND HIGH SCHOOLS HANDBOOK

4 UNIVERSITIES AND HIGH SCHOOLS HANDBOOK

Revised Sept 2013

Schools and colleges that are recipients of federal funds are obligated to comply with Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 and its specific obligations related to sexual harassment and gender equity.  Athletics directors should consult with the institution’s Title IX coordinator and legal counsel to ensure that all adopted policies and procedures conform to these laws.

DOWNLOAD THE HANDBOOK TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO IMPLEMENT A SAFE4ATHLETES PROGRAM FOR YOUR SCHOOL

Published in Policy
Thursday, 19 January 2012 19:18

MAINTENANCE OF THE COACH-ATHLETE RELATIONSHIP

The investigation of relationship maintenance strategies has received considerable attention in various types of dyads including romantic, marital, and familial relationships. No research, however, has yet investigated the use of maintenance strategies in the coach-athlete partnership. Thus, this study aimed to investigate coaches’ and athletes’ perceptions of the strategies they use to maintain relationship quality.

Published in Research

Written by: Elaine Raakman1, Kim Dorsch2 and Daniel Rhind3

1Justplay Inc., Burlington, ON, Canada E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 2University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada 3Centre for Youth Sport and Athlete Welfare, Brunel University, UK

Published in Research
A:·       Coach/athlete abuse is a foreseeable risk of harm to participants, and as such, the Club has the responsibility to protect athletes against the occurrence of such harm.

·       The failure to have policies or prevention systems is, in itself, an action by the Club to take no action.  In other words and for example, if sued by the victim or her/his family, a court would most likely say “The athlete was harmed by the Club’s failure to exercise reasonable care on behalf of the athlete by failing to adopt and administer policies that would have prevented the abuse suffered.” 

Published in FAQ
A:
  • Parents want to know that a sports program is safe for their children.  Having specific policies that address these issues will increase parent trust and confidence in club leadership, coaches, or ownership.
  • Athletes can concentrate on their sports, without second-guessing their “gut feeling” that someone’s behavior isn’t right.
  • Clear rules and a fair process reduce the Club’s risk from lawsuits that may be filed by dismissed coaches or the abused victim or her/his family.  
  • Many national sport governing bodies (NGB) do not yet require their Club members to have comprehensive athlete protection policies, and if they do, these policies may not address bullying or coach/peer athlete conduct that falls short of criminal behavior. 
  • Even when NGBs have processes that are applicable in cases of athlete sexual abuse, reporting and investigation procedures take a considerable amount of time and because the NGB is not the employer, the NGB in not in a position to address immediate suspension of an employee in the case of serious misconduct.

The local Club is responsible for the safety of its program participants and is obligated to take immediate action to remedy a hostile environment.

Published in FAQ
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Every athlete deserves a safe and positive sports environment. SPEAK UP if the way you are being treated feels wrong. 
If you need advice in sorting through a situation or concern. SAFE4ATHLETES is here to help.

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